Penguin Awareness Day

Contest Info

  • Started: 1/20/2011 11:10
  • Ended: 1/23/2011 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 29
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Penguin Awareness Day
Contest Directions: Penguin Awareness Day 2011 is today, Jan. 20, 2011, offering an opportunity to celebrate penguins around the world. The penguin comes in a number of different species and some are being threatened by climate change, making the Awareness Day even more important. It's easy to take part in the celebration of Penguin Awareness Day and share it with those you love. Here are some tips on how to celebrate: wear black and white, send a Penguin Day e-card, replace your desktop with penguin pictures, pass along penguin pictures, or watch penguin-related films.
Here's one more way to celebrate Penguin Awareness Day: photoshop penguins any way you wish.

Contest Info

    • Started: 1/20/2011 11:10
    • Ended: 1/23/2011 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 29
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
29 pictures
  • The Emperor Penguin in Armour

    The Emperor Penguin in Armour
  • Penguin Going on Vacation

    Penguin Going on Vacation
  • Iron Man Penguin

    Iron Man Penguin
  • Penguin Taking a Shower

    Penguin Taking a Shower
  • Penguin Reality Cartoon

    Penguin Reality Cartoon
  • Penguin Family Accordion Band

    Penguin Family Accordion Band
  • Robo Penguin

    Robo Penguin
  • Batman Penguin Teasing

    Batman Penguin Teasing
  • Penguin in a Tux

    Penguin in a Tux
  • Giant Penguin in the City

    Giant Penguin in the City
29 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: Balding Penguins: Due to unknown reasons, the majority of nestling penguins are losing their feathers and some also died, reports Discovery News with reference to the Wildlife Conservation Society, USA. "Feather loss disorder" appeared recently and even affected the penguin colonies on both coasts of the South Atlantic. Scientists noticed feather loss in penguins for the first time in 2006. Researchers from the South African Foundation for Conservation of Coastal Birds discovered that 59% of young African penguins, inhabiting the places closer to the research station, had lost their feathers. By the following year, this figure increased to 97%. Also, the growth in nestlings suffering with the disease was very slow when compared to the growth of nestlings without disease. In 2007, another group of scientists from the Wildlife foundation and University of Michigan, USA also noticed a similar condition amongst the magellanic penguins, inhabiting the other side of the South Atlantic. Unfortunate sick nestlings suffered from heat as nothing was available to hide themselves from the sun rays. "Naked" nestlings were smaller than normal ones since much of their energy was spent on heat regulation. Many of the sick birds died. "Feather loss is seen rarely in birds and therefore it is necessary to carry out investigations for determining the causes of disease and also the chances of spread to other penguins" said Dee Boersma, who has been studying magellanic penguins for more than 30 years. "We need to understand how to control this disease as penguins are already suffering from oil pollution in water and climatic changes. It is necessary to protect them from yet another problem". Among other reasons for this unusual disease, Ms. Boersma and her colleagues are considering activity of pathogenic micro organisms, thyroid gland diseases, nutritional disorders or genetic factors. Penguins don't like loneliness and therefore, even in the sea, they are found in groups. During breeding time, they form huge colonies, the strength of which varies from a few thousands to several millions individuals. The Southern hemisphere is the homeland of modern penguins. Tube-nosed flying birds, which inhabited the Earth in the Cretaceous period of the Mesozoic era (around 100 million years ago) are considered to be the ancestors of penguins. Penguins got their present name due to their resemblance to the Great Auk a representative of Alcidae family, which became extinct on the earth in the mid 19th century. Moving on land, the Great auk held its body practically vertical and its wings served as fins. Its name was pronounced as Pinguinus impennis (from English pin and wing) in scientific systematic catalogues. The first Europeans to see penguins were sailors from Vasco De Gama team, but they considered the penguins as goose. At the end of the 16th century the English sailors were the first to "get familiar" with penguins and since they had already seen the Great Auks many a times, immediately saw the close resemblance to Great Auks, so the English sailors started calling them "Penguins" keeping the Auks in mind. In order to avoid confusion, Georges-Louis Leclerc Buffon, the French naturalist who lived in the 18th century, suggested to call these southern inhabitants as "manshota", which corresponded to the concept "awkward". But since Great Auks became extinct soon after the , division, suggested by Buffon, became ineffective. Lifestyle: Penguins (Sphenisciformes) belong to order of flightless birds with 18 species. Penguins make their nests on stones and gravel while some penguin types - under tree roots or in caves and only very large types such as the Emperor penguins lay one egg directly on the snow. The remaining 17 types take care of the nestlings together. Nestlings of all types of penguins are born with vision, covered with soft fur, which changes to plumage as they grow. When the parents are busy catching feed, especially from the sea the grown up "Antarctic" birds gather in dense clusters to protect themselves from the severe cold. In such a crowded place, the adult penguins, unwillingly trample down the nestlings killing them and 80% of nestlings and eggs are killed by different predators (sea gulls, petrels, rats, stray dogs and even by crabs on the Galapagos islands). This percentage is two times less in the central portion of the colony but the death of future generation occurs, predominantly, due to diseases and the large number of deadly parasites. Diet: Penguins, considered to be excellent swimmers, nevertheless, spend a lot of physical energy in catching fish. Moreover, they spend several days in the sea for their satisfaction and also to train the young birds in catching food. French ornithologists reckon that penguins consume around 85% of the total food eaten by other types of birds in southern Ocean and this is around 50 million tones of seafood, the major share of which comprises of fish, krill and crustaceans. In search of food, penguins dive up to 50 meters and also up to 100 meters and above. Despite this, penguins are successful in finding food only once every ten times. According to the assumption of Sergey Shlangov, the famous Russian ornithologist, penguins hunt in groups, which was confirmed after observing a hunt of a 3 ton sea elephant by 350 male penguins, inhabiting Aldar national park. After tiring out the elephant in water, they brought him onto land and killed it thus securing food for the entire herd for several winter months. Penguins do not touch the potential food which is thrown onto the shore.