Earth Hour

Contest Info

  • Started: 4/2/2012 17:00
  • Ended: 4/5/2012 17:00
  • Level: advanced
  • Entries: 30
  • Jackpot:
  • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
  • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
  • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
  • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
Earth Hour
Contest Directions: Last Saturday, March 31, people and businesses around the world participated in Earth Hour 2012, turning off their lights at 8:30 p.m. local time. Earth Hour tradition was established by the World Wildlife Fund in 2007 as a way to bring attention to energy consumption, sustainability, and climate change issues. This year, participants in 6494 cities in 150 countries countries darkened homes, skyscrapers, and landmarks around the world. Next year the event is going to be even more massive, so don't be surprised if your city goes dark on March 30, 2013.
Let's see what would happen if Earth Hour went more global by turning lights off in the famous movies and paintings. In this contest, give night theme to famous paintings and movie posters. You are welcome to change the movie titles to reflect the night theme. Please don't use only brightness adjustment or filters, put more effort in your work by adding moon light, changing backgrounds, adding a lit candle, etc. A good example of an entry for this contest would be Forrest Gump movie poster showing Forrest Gump sitting on a bench holding a candle in the moonlight.

Contest Info

    • Started: 4/2/2012 17:00
    • Ended: 4/5/2012 17:00
    • Level: advanced
    • Entries: 30
    • Jackpot:
    • FN Advanced 1st Place $5
    • FN Advanced 2nd Place $3
    • FN Advanced 3rd Place $2
    • FN Advanced 4th Place $1
30 pictures
  • La Petite Mendiant At Night by Bouguereau

    La Petite Mendiant At Night by Bouguereau
  • Dogs Playing Poker with Candles

    Dogs Playing Poker with Candles
  • Jack Nicholson in American Gothic at Night

    Jack Nicholson in American Gothic at Night
  • King Kong by Candle Light

    King Kong by Candle Light
  • The Sound of Music at Night

    The Sound of Music at Night
  • The Mona Lisa Going to Bed

    The Mona Lisa Going to Bed
  • Whistler's Mother Asleep

    Whistler's Mother Asleep
  • Pirates of the Caribbean at Night

    Pirates of the Caribbean at Night
  • Empire of the Moon

    Empire of the Moon
  • Sandra Bullock Goes to The Dark Side

    Sandra Bullock Goes to The Dark Side
30 image entries
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This contest is fueled by the following news: On Saturday, millions of people worldwide will join in what is possibly the largest flash mob on the planet, the Earth Hour campaign, being held under the auspices of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). People of 147 countries will turn off the lights in their households and businesses, reports the Sydney Morning Herald. Agreeing to do without electricity for one hour a year, people thereby express love for Mother Nature and the planet. The event traditionally takes place on the last Saturday of March, which this year fell on the 31st. The idea to hold Earth Hour first came to the mind of representatives of WWF and staff of theAustralian newspaper Sydney Morning Herald. Since then, Sydney has been rightfully considered the "capital" of this flash mob. This year Australians will do everything not to shame this title. It is expected that several million citizens of the country will agree to have a candlelight supper. More than 150 local cities and towns, which will turn off the lights from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. local time, will participate in the campaign. Staff members of the Sydney Opera House as well as maintenance workers of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the capital's largest bridge, will be the first to "flick the switch." These first will not be stopped even if one of the opera scenes is being performed at that time. In the words of a World Wildlife Fund spokesperson, this year people of 147 countries, including Russians, will join Earth Hour. Thus, for example, on March 31 at 8:30 p.m., residents of St. Petersburg are planning to light a thousand candles on Palace Square. The WWF staff members consider that, agreeing to do without electricity for an hour, people show how important the role and responsibility of each of them for what is happening on the planet today. And although skeptics insist that turning off lights for an hour across the globe is unlikely to reduce the emission of harmful greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, the authors of the cherished dream say that they didn't plan on Earth Hour bringing any particular benefit to the planet. Environmentalists maintain that this flash mob will, in fact, be a symbolic gesture and that its purpose is to unite everyone not indifferent to issues concerning the environment and planet as a whole. The first Earth Hour campaign, held in 2007, was participated in by 2.2 million people throughout the world. A year later the number of participants reached 50 million. Earth Hour is an annual international event held by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). It is held on the last Saturday of March and calls upon everyone -- individuals, organizations, schools, municipalities, commercial establishments -- to switch off the lights and other nonessential electrical items (except elevators) for an hour to stimulate interest in the issue of climate change, energy unification of mankind. This event was organized for the first time by WWF in Australia jointly with publication of the Sydney Morning Herald in 2007, gained worldwide support the following year, and in 2009 had already become the most mass event in the history of mankind -- according to WWF estimates, it touched more than one billion people globally. The next Earth Hour will be held on Saturday March 20, 2013 from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. local time. The previous one was held on March 31, 2012. Criticism of the campaign is usually voiced in several directions and, as a rule, is related to lack of awareness about it: Those who are convinced that turning off the lights for one hour will not save electricity and stop the emission of greenhouse gases, although from the start of the campaign this was not its goal and switching off lights is mainly symbolic. Those who warn against voltage surges and power grid failures, although such problems have never occurred during the campaign since such surges are common for power stations: every day people come home simultaneously and turn off the lights or go to bed and switch them off at the same time. In addition to this, power engineers are informed about the time of the campaign and adjust the daily energy consumption curve. Many in general are critical of theories linking climate change to anthropogenic factors and therefore consider this campaign completely senseless.